Aug 24

What's Up Wednesday -- Kelsey

#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Kelsey, who represented Dayton Children’s Hospital at the 2015 Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day.

So, Kelsey…what’s up?

Aug 12

Vaccines: One of Pediatricians' "Super Powers" to Protect Kids

To recognize National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM), the American Academy of Pediatrics is promoting its #WhyIVax campaign on social media, sharing resources from HealthyChildren.org, YouTube videos by Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, MBE on vaccines, AAP Voices blogs about the power of vaccines by authors that include Ari Brown, MD, and an interactive infographic on  the history of vaccines displaying the long and impressive history of vaccines.


 

After twenty years in private practice pediatrics, I have had some pretty rewarding and memorable moments. I've convinced kids to drink more water, eat more vegetables, exercise regularly, and clean their rooms. My white coat is my super power!

These tiny victories remind me of why I love my job—I can make a positive difference in my patients' lives. I also feel this way when I vaccinate my patients.

 

 

Aug 10

What's Up Wednesday -- Leanne

Leanne_WhatsUpWednesday.jpg#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Leanne, the 16-year-old founder of Positive Impact for Kids, a non-profit which raises funds to help hospital staff better meet the emotional and physical needs of their pediatric patients.

So, Leanne…what’s up?

Aug 03

What's Up Wednesday -- Kate

IMG_4973.JPG#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Kate, a 2015 Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero. When she was 4 years old, Kate was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), a genetic, progressive, degenerative disease, that causes muscle weakness and other neurological, respiratory and orthopedic issues. With her Boston Children's Hospital team by her side, Kate knows that the possibilities for her future are limitless.

So, Kate.....what's up?

Jul 27

What's Up Wednesday -- Anna-Maria

KAP_CHA_Advocacy_Dinner_2016-042.jpg#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Anna-Maria, a recent Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero. Anna-Maria was diagnosed eight years ago with a low-grade brain tumor of the hypothalamus and optic pathways that caused hydrocephalus. Currently in treatment, and followed closely by multiple highly specialized physicians at Kosair Children's Hospital, Anna-Maria attends high school and is actively involved with her swim team and youth group.

So Anna-Maria…what’s up?

Jul 20

What's Up Wednesday -- Christian

#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Chrtistian, a recent Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero. Christian was born missing half of his brain. When he was 10-months-old, Christian was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, hydrocephly and quadriplegia. Since then he has been receiving treatment at Children’s Specialized Hospital in New Jersey.

So Christian…what’s up?

Jul 13

What's Up Wednesday -- Capri

Capri_1.jpg#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Capri, a recent Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero. When she was just 13 days old, Capri was diagnosed with sickle cell anemia. As a member of the Teen Advisory Council at Levine Children’s Hospital she feels strongly that it is important to educate those around her about what it’s like having asthma and sickle cell anemia.

So Capri….what’s up?

Jul 06

What's Up Wednesday -- Grant

#WhatsUpWednesday is our chance to hear from the teens who are involved with the Speak Now for Kids community. This week’s post will focus on Grant, a recent Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero. At 11 years old, Grant was diagnosed with medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric type of malignant brain cancer. Thanks in part to the medical team at Nationwide Children’s, 16-year-old Grant is now tumor free.

So, Grant…what’s up?

Jul 01

Kids Get Arthritis, Too

Nikki, mom of 2016 Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero, Peyton, shares what it was like when a simple fall turned into a diagnosis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Read Peyton’s original post here: http://bit.ly/1TFaEFa


rsz_akron_childrens_hospital_domers_peyton_photo.jpgIt began with a typical fall of a toddler. She fell at a relative’s house and didn’t even really hit her knee. After a forty minute car ride home, she couldn’t walk. Peyton cried when she tried to put weight on her right leg and could barely move it. The swelling – it was unreal. It was like someone had stuffed a small orange in her knee. Off to the emergency room we went.

The physician came in and explained it was probably a bad sprain and that her x-rays were clear. But we needed to follow up with orthopedics at Akron Children’s Hospital if it didn’t start getting better within a week. We saw an orthopedist twice that same week due to her pain, continued swelling, lack of movement, and most concerning – her inability to walk much. They went over her x-rays and took blood to look for bacterial infections and Lyme disease which all came back negative.

Jul 01

2016 Speak Now For Kids Family Advocacy Day Hero: Kaleb

rsz_kap_cha_advocacy_dinner_2016-022.jpgAt their 18-week OB appointment, Kaleb’s parents learned that their baby boy had challenges. They were told that his heart was not developing correctly, and he was going to need numerous surgeries to repair his cardiovascular system. At birth, Kaleb was diagnosed with dextrocardia and heterotaxy. In other words, Kaleb’s heart is located on the opposite side of his body and points in the opposite direction. He was also born without a spleen and with malrotated intestines.

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